Victor Victori

Victor Victori

b. 1943
Rutherford, NJ
Origin: South Korea
Oil, enamel, cement

Biography

Victori was born in 1943 as the third of six children in a small farming village outside of Seoul, South Korea. His father, a peach farmer and Mayor of their small town during the Korean War, intended for his son to take over the family business; however Victori had aspirations to explore his artistic passions.

After serving a few years in the Air Force, he left South Korea in 1969 and traveled through Europe spending most of his time studying the works of Rembrandt, Michaelangelo, Da Vinci, and Picasso. Much of his skill was honed while living in the small art district in Paris — Montmartre, before he re-directed his journey to the U.S.

After arriving in New York City in 1972, Victori undertook his largest project up until that point — a mural of all the U.S. Presidents. It was delivered to the Nixon White House in 1973 and remains there to this day. During the 70’s and 80’s Victori traveled the country working mostly as a portrait artist doing various art shows, exhibitions, and private commissions. The speed Victori brought to his profession allowed him to setup a shop, gain clients in the double digits, produce finished portrait work, pack up and move onto a new city within a matter of days. Through the years of constant travelling and working, his identity fluctuated between celebrity status and starving artist. Once Victori decided some energy had to be shifted back towards his original work, he returned to the Northeast and opened a gallery on Park Avenue in New York City. The Park Avenue gallery, located in the east walkway of the Helmsley building underpass, was home to private sittings, instructional painting classes, networking soirees as well as the birth of a few of Victori’s original prized pieces. The space was eventually bought out due to eminent building renovation and Victori transitioned away from New York City.

Victori’s career and experience in portrait work spanned much of his adult life, however he still managed to focus on developing a unique and divergent method of painting; a method that essentially layers what is seen in a single portrait and incites a deeper perception of his paintings’ subjects. Having gazed upon so many thousands of faces during his career, Victori realized that a single instance of time frozen in a portrait hides the multiple moods, emotions, and states of mind concealed behind stationary, fixed expressions. “Multiplism”, as he coined it, reveals the many behind the one, unfolding all possible dimensions of a being in one multi-faceted piece of work. Victori’s advances into Multiplism have brought about paintings such as the “Many Faces of Mona” in which Da Vinci’s iconic painting is transformed into a multiple-faced version of her former self. Victori began developing this style of art in the 1970s and continues to evolve its meaning and composition, not just through painting, but mural and sculpture work as well.

One of Victori’s largest scale projects of the past decade is an 11-foot high 10,000-pound sculpture named “Minds of Moses” that rests on the property of Victori’s corner home depicting the many sides of the religious figure. Alongside the sculpture are 3 slightly smaller cement statues of Zeus, Jesus, and Buddha. The completion of these pieces spurred much local news coverage for the artist and he has since added various other abstract pieces to the outdoor collection.

Victori’s repertoire also includes murals, spanning as large as 20 x 20 feet. A few of them, originally constructed out of Masonite panels and painted outdoors, now cover the ceilings and walls of Victori’s home, while a number of others were completed on the interior walls of many clients’ homes. “The Circle of Life”, a 15 x 20 foot mural, depicts hundreds of swirling naked bodies as they encircle a bright horizon. It has become one of Victori’s signature works and is representative of his mastery as an artist.

At the age of 69, Victori continues working, building, and creating, perhaps at a quicker pace than ever. He currently works out of two private studios located in northern New Jersey where he focuses on expanding his anthology of paintings, murals, and sculpture of varying scale. He is father to five grown sons and lives with his wife, Maria.

Multiplism

Victori’s career and experience in portrait work spanned much of his adult life; however, he managed to focus on developing a unique and divergent style of painting called Multiplism beginning in the early 1970s. Having gazed upon so many thousands of faces during his career, Victori realized that a single instance of time frozen in a portrait hides the multiple moods, emotions, and states of mind concealed behind a stationary, fixed expression.

Multiplism is Victori’s way and discovery of painting time.

Notable Collections

  • The White House Collection: “The Presidents Mural” 1973
  • Nixon Library: President Richard M. Nixon Portrait 1973
  • President Ronald Reagan
  • Senator Edward Kennedy
  • Joe Franklin (television personality)
  • Harvard Industries
  • BCE Development Properties
  • F.E.L. Inc.
  • Fort Lee City Hall
  • East Rutherford City Hall
  • Deal Country Club, NJ
  • Moody Foundation, Texas
  • Korean Express Corp.
  • General and Mrs. Boots Blasse
  • Archbishop Gerety, NJ
  • Sacred Heart Cathedral, NJ
  • Honorary Judge George Malhoit
  • Keith Olberman (MSNBC Anchor)
  • Arthur Levitt (Chmn, SEC)
  • Lillian Vernon Co.
  • Burt Reynolds
  • Trump Organization Collection, incl. Donald J. Trump
  • Rutherford City Hall

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_Victori